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Halloween Science Lab

 Posted by on October 30, 2012
Oct 302012
 

We’re attending the Trunk or Treat festivities at our church on Halloween. I’m planning the decorations for the trunk of our car. My husband likes to dress up as a mad scientist, and I’m guessing that’s what he’ll be again this year. A Halloween science lab would be the perfect trunk decoration. You could also use these props as decorations for a Halloween party.

Halloween Science Lab

Halloween Science Lab

When thinking about what props to include, I thought about things that would glow in the dark or under a black light. I have two battery powered black lights that will help make many things fluoresce.

Here’s the day time scene.

Halloween Science Lab daylight

Glowing Spider Web

I purchased this prop. It glows under a black light.

Glow in the Dark Spiders and Pumpkins

I made glowing play dough two different ways.

  1. By adding glow in the dark paint to a homemade play dough recipe. {See this great no cook play dough recipe from The Imagination Tree.} Glow in the dark paint will make the dough glow for a while. It will eventually lose its charge if left in just the dark. However, it will glows some under a black light.
  2. By adding tonic water to the no cook play dough recipe in place of regular water. The tonic water will fluoresce under a black light. This method doesn’t really work. It fluoresces in some small spots, but it’s difficult to see.

I placed the play dough into spider molds I found. {They are candy molds, but they work for play dough, too.} I also placed some dough into pumpkin ice cube trays.

Glowing Slime or Oobleck

glowing oobleck

I mixed equal parts cornstarch and tonic water together to make oobleck – a lovely slime. This will fluoresce blue under the black light.

Vials and Jars

Tonic Water, Vampire Blood, and Salt Water

Blue liquid – Tonic water fluoresces blue under a black light because of the presence of quinine.

Vampire blood {extract of chlorophyll infused in oil} – The green chlorophyll fluoresces red under a black light. See recipe for making vampire blood. It is a really blood red under the black light.

Purple liquid – salt water fluoresces purple under a black light.

glow in the dark water

Orange liquid – orange glow in the dark paint and water

Green liquid – green glow in the dark paint and water

rose water

Rose water – rose petals and water. It doesn’t glow. It just adds a fun mixture to the scene.

Dry Ice Fog

If I can find dry ice at the store {meaning it’s not sold out}, I’ll add some dry ice to a bowl of water to add some fog to the trunk.
**Safety Warning: Dry ice should be handled carefully. Make sure you know the proper precautions to take and how to store it safely. Read more about dry ice at Steve Spangler’s blog.

 

What things would you add to your Halloween science lab?

Be sure to check out the rest of our Halloween activities.

 

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  4 Responses to “Halloween Science Lab”

  1. Looks like a fun Halloween night. I’m impressed how many things you found to glow under your black light. Very fun!

  2. Great post combining Halloween and science! We did pumpkin chunkin’ (mini candy corn pumpkins and Popsicle stick catapults) for our trunk-or-treating event this year. Hope you had a safe and happy Halloween. (P.S. I was a scientist too, not too stretching for me).
    Jessica recently posted..Happy Halloween!My Profile

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